The New Zealand Guild of Storytellers

Whangateau Acoustic Music And Social Club Event, February 29, 2016
Posted: February 29th, 2016 by Keith Levy | Leave a comment

Dear Keith,

We have just got home, and have been marvelling at the way in which you entertained and charmed us
with exquisitely crafted rhymed storytelling! Very rare to see a performer of your ilk.
We were also impressed by your insightful and wise and loving life illustrations.
Derek and Pam Gordon.
Waiwera.


Whangateau Acoustic Music And Social Club Event, February 29, 2016.
Posted: February 29th, 2016 by Keith Levy | Leave a comment

Just spent an hour mesmerised by your beautifully crafted word magic. What a treat and thank you.
Andy Hamilton,
The Dirt Road Orchestra
Puhoi.



A Story About Story
Posted: December 1st, 2015 by Gaye Sutton | 1 comment

Hello,

It feels such a privilege to offer you a story on our Guild page..  It’s a small story and it’s told during an interview by an old friend who has now passed.  Richard Clark was a well-loved community broadcaster in Masterton and a well-known photographer, filmmaker and lover of life around the globe.

It may be a small story but it’s message is BIG.  Richard has just asked me: “what is storytelling to you?”

I thought I’d offer it in our voices for you to hear. Enjoy.

 



Story Of The Month
Posted: June 20th, 2015 by admin | Leave a comment

The Horned Animals’ Party            

Diane Ferlatte

unnamed

 

Erik Pearson on banjo & guitar                         Diane Ferlatte, Storyteller

A story from Antigua (British West Indies)

*  audience claps twice

You know, there’s nothing like a good party.   Everyone likes a good party.

Well, it happened one time that all the horned animals decided they were going to have a party, but only the animals who had horns could come.

Well, pretty soon the word started spreading around about that party.

(sing)

Party*, party*

Did you hear about the party*, party*,

Party over here, party over there,’

Party over here, party over there,

Party*, party*,

Party*, party*.

 

Pretty soon everybody heard about that party, even Bro’-dog and Bro’-cat.    And they wanted to go.

But how could they go?   They didn’t have any horns.

Well, Bro’-dog, he thought high and he thought low.

(sing)

He thought high

and he thought low.

He thought high

       and he thought low.

Finally he thought of a way they could go.   What they did, they slipped on over to the graveyard and they dug up a goat’s horn, and ol Bro’-dog, he said,

“Woof, I’ll wear the horns one half of the night, you wear the horns the other half of the night, that way we’ll both get to the party!”

Bro’-cat said,  “Sounds pretty good to me!”

Well, the next night they slipped on over to where the party was going to be and hid themselves in the bushes and laid low.    Bro’-dog, he slipped the horns on first and said,   “I’ll go in for  a few minutes, then come out, and let you go in.”

“That’s fine with me.”

Old Bro’-dog, he headed on up to the door and knocked (knocking sound), and they let him in.

Ooohhh, it was horns for days, and plenty of food, plenty to drink, and the best musicians and the best drummer.   Bro’-dog couldn’t believe it.   He headed right over to the food.   He started eating and eating, and had him something to drink.   Pretty soon he started dancing and singing.

Ooohhh, he was having a good time.

Aboon da, aboon da,

Aboon da, tara boon da

Woof, aboon da, aboon da

Aboon da, tara boon da

Woof, aboon,da aboon da

Ah, he was having a good time.   And you know how it is when you are at a good party, you don’t think about leaving, do you?    Bro’-dog didn’t give Bro’cat a second thought.    He just kept on dancing and singing.

(dance and sing)

Aboon da, aboon da,

Aboon da, tara boon da

Aboon da, aboon da

Aboon da, tara boon da

Well, there was Bro’cat out side saying to himself,   “I wonder where Bro’dog is.   He should have been here a long time ago.   Well, I guess he’ll be here in a minute.”

Do you think Bro’dog was giving him a second thought.   Ha!

(dance and sing)

Aboon da, aboon da,

Aboon da, tara boon da

Woof, aboon da, aboon da

Aboon da, tara boon da

Bro’cat, he got tired of waiting.   So he tipped on over to the door, then went around the side of the house to the window.   He could see Bro’dog.   He said,

(whisper)  “Bro’dog, Bro’dog, Bro’dog, Bro’dog.”

Do you think Bro’dog heard him?

(dance and sing)

Aboon da, aboon da,

Aboon da, tara boon da

Aboon da, aboon da

Oh-oh, but somebody did hear him.   It was Mr Bull, the boss of the party, and you know how bulls are.   When they get mad, they start shuffling on the ground and their nose starts flaring up.   Oh, he was mad.   He went to the front door and he opened it and said,   “Mmmmmmmm, get on away from here!   There ain’t no dog in here.”   And he slammed the door.   He was mad.

 

Well, Bro’cat was a little mad, too.   Oh, he was so mad he went up to the door and said, “Bro’dog,Bro’dog, BRO’DOG!”

This time Bro’dog heard him.    He started easing towards the door.

(dance and sing)

Aboon da, aboon da,

Aboon da, tara boon da

Aboonda, aboon da

He opened the door and he said,   “Shhh, Bro’cat, be cool.  I’ll be out in a minute.  Shhhh.”

Oops!  Bro’dog saw Bro’bull looking at him and he said, “There ain’t no dog in here,” and he slammed the door.

 

Well, Bro’cat, he had had it! He went back up to that door and he said,

“Bro’dog, Bro’dog, owwww BRO’DOG, come on out of there.”  And when Bro’bull heard that noise he got to thinking, “Maybe there is a dog in here.    Maybe we should look.”

And old Bro’dog, he said,  “Yeah, I’ll help you look.”   And old Bro’dog started easing himself toward the door.

(dance and sing)

Aboon da, aboon da,

Aboon da, tara boon da

Aboon da, aboon da

Aboon da, tara boon da

He wasn’t watching where he was going, and he hit the wall.   His horns fell off.

When Bro’bull saw it was Bro’dog, he turned to the other horned animals and he said, “Get him!”

And all the horned animals started running toward Bro’dog.   And Bro’dog, he took off out the front door.

 

Boogadie, boogadie,  Boogadie, boogadie,  Boogadie, boogadie,  Boogadie, boogadie,

Boogadie, boogadie,  ooohhh, but who did he run into but Bro’cat –ooohhh – and the argument they had!   They started biting and scratching and with hair flying every which way.   Back and forth, back and forth, and there was old Bro’cat on his back on the ground.   He was getting the worst end of this fight, when all of the sudden Bro’cat just kind of reached out and scratched Bro’dog right there in the corner of his mouth.

Have you ever seen a dog’s mouth, how in the corner it always looks kinda raw and pink-like?   Well, that’s how come.  And that’s how come today Bro’dog and Bro’cat are not friends.   Bro’cat ain’t never forgot about that.

(sing)

Party*, party*

Did you hear about the party*, party*,

Party over here, party over there,’

Party over here, party over there,

Party*, party*,

Party*, party*.

 

Diane is one of our members from USA.     She is also much beloved by many NZ’ers and has said we may put this story on our web and in our magazine.   She first shared it in a collection called READY-TO-TELL TALES edited by David Holt and Bill Mooney.

When she was growing up DIANE FERLATTE heard wonderful stories on her grandparents’ porch in New Orleans.   But she didn’t become interested in telling them herself until she adopted her son, Joey.   She not only tells Southern and African-American stories, but those from many other cultures, sometimes utilising her skill in American sign language.

She says that when she first read this story it made her thik of her father, who told similar stories.   It uses lots of humour to address the conflict between two friends.    It says a lot about the need to beware of good intentions.

When she was growing up DIANE FERLATTE heard wonderful stories on her grandparents’ porch in New Orleans.   But she didn’t become interested in telling them herself until she adopted her son, Joey.   She not only tells Southern and African-American stories, but those from many other cultures, sometimes utilising her skill in American sign language.

She says that when she first read this story it made her think of her father, who told similar stories.   It uses lots of humour to address the conflict between two friends.    It says a lot about the need to beware of good intentions.



Story of the Month
Posted: February 14th, 2014 by Antoinette Everts | Leave a comment

lion_mouse

The Lion and the Mouse

One of Aesop’s Fables (retold by Antoinette Everts at NZIOS)

One day the Lion, the King of the Jungle, was sitting on top of his rock in the sun, looking down at his jungle kingdom.

Everything was quiet. All the animals feared him, and stayed far away from the lion. He’d finished his dinner, he was bored and lonely and tired. It was time for a nap. He laid his great head on his giant paws, and soon his snores filled the jungle.

A little mouse wandered past. He saw the great lion fast asleep on his rock.

“Well,” said the mouse, “This is my chance to get up close to the fearsome beast!” and he climbed up close to the lion. The lion slept on.

“I think I’ll have some fun,” said the mouse, and climbed onto the lion’s back. He played with the tawny lion’s mane. He studied the ears, and gently pulled a whisker. Still the lion slept on. The mouse decided to use the lion’s head as a slide – right down to his paws. But at that moment the lion woke up and – put his giant paw, claws out, over the mouse.

“How dare you play games with me, little mouse. Don’t you know that I am the King of the Jungle!” and he roared.

The mouse shook with fright. “Please don’t eat me!’

“You are such a little mouthful, you’re hardly worth my opening my mouth,” said the lion, not hungry at all after his big meal. “Still, you’ll do as a snack.”

“Please! Please don’t eat me. If you spare my life, one day I’ll save your life in return,” said the mouse.

When he heard that, the lion roared with laughter. “What, you little squirt, how can you ever help great mighty me? But just for fun, I’ll let you go.” The lion lifted his mighty paw. The mouse thanked the lion, repeated his promise of help, and scuttled away into the jungle.

The next day, hunters came to the jungle. They spread a rope net right by the lion’s den, and when the lion came home, he was trapped in the net and couldn’t move.

Again his roars filled the jungle, this time full of despair and fear. “Please come and help me, someone, anyone!”

Most animals stayed far away from the dangerous beast. But the little mouse came close, and studied the situation.

“The hunters have used just one rope to make this net. Stay still please,” said the mouse. “I will set you free.” And the mouse began to gnaw with his sharp little teeth on the rope around the lion. He nibbled and chewed and gnawed , until finally he bit through the rope. The lion rose to his feet and shrugged the rest of the rope off him.

“You have indeed saved my life,” said the lion, and bowed before the little mouse. “Please be my friend and accept my gratitude.” And the lion and the mouse became great friends.